Thursday, December 27, 2007

Sukju Namul (Korean Seasoned Mung Bean Sprouts)

I know I said enough of the Korean recipes for a while, but what can I say? That's what I had in the fridge.

The two trays of banh cuon (Vietnamese steamed rice noodle sheets stuffed with pork) that I bought for my dad's 60th birthday party also came with two big bags of mung bean sprouts. I knew we were gonna be fed a lot at my oldest uncle's Christmas party.

But after the birthday party and before the Christmas party, my cousins wanted to have dinner on Christmas Eve together. I really wasn't in the mood to deal with last-minute crowds at the grocery store, so what I had available were fixin's for a Korean dinner.

I made a batch of venison bulgogi (Korean marinated meat) and some banh xeo-ish pajeon (Vietnamese crepe-ish Korean pancake). I already had baechu kimchee (Korean pickled napa cabbage) in the fridge. And of course, those two big bags of mung bean sprouts.

That little plate in the top photo is because it looks nicer than showing you this mound of seasoned sprouts (there's more in another bowl). And yes, we pretty much ate it all.

The recipe is pretty simple. The only variation I did this time from my recipe for kong namul (Korean seasoned soy bean sprouts) was adding a few dashes of rice vinegar. Which lil' sis and the oldest '87 said they much preferred. Actually, what the oldest '87 said was that she doesn't like the bean sprouts at Korean restaurants, but she liked mine. :P

Sukju Namul (Korean Seasoned Mung Bean Sprouts) 

You'll need:
1 large bag of mung bean sprouts
sesame seeds
sesame oil

Optional: rice vinegar

Wash mung bean sprouts and let drain in a colander.

Boil a pot of water. When the water boils, add the bean sprouts and let them quickly blanch. Don't turn away from the stove. This takes only a few minutes. You want the bean sprouts to just soften.

Drain into colander. Don't rinse or you'll get the sprouts even wetter. Just shake the colander to remove as much water as possible.

Then dump the sprouts into a bowl and add a few drizzles of sesame oil, a few dashes of salt (not soy sauce so the sprouts stay white), and sprinkles of sesame seeds. I didn't measure so just taste and adjust according to your preference.

Add a few drizzles of rice vinegar if you wish.


One of my cousins made a crunchy Chex mix, spicy and regular.
  And the middle '87 and oldest '88 made Christmas cupcakes.

After sitting around a bit after dinner, the kids were all about to take off to play rock band or whatever that video game is called, until one of the middle cousins (the one who made the Chex mix) reminded them of their manners. And so my cousins cleaned up and washed my dishes. :)

1 year ago today, Sweet Corn Tomalito.


  1. Nice. I have most of these ingredients already, except for the sesame seeds. So I will definitely give this a try soon. I think the rice vinegar sounds like a good addition.

  2. This is my favorite panchan at the Korean BBQ. That and daikon kimchee. Thanks, now I can make it at home.

  3. Marvin,
    That reminds me. I still have yet one more bag of sprouts left.

    Mary Ruth,
    This is one of my favorite panchan too.

  4. yess! thanks for posting the recipe big sis, you know this is one recipe i will definitely use!

  5. I havent made this in a long time and I havent tried it with rice vinegar. I will sure give this a try.

  6. Lil' sis,
    You're welcome. :)

    I liked it better with rice vinegar.

  7. I love this dish at the Korean restaurant.


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