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Thursday, September 11, 2008

100 Vietnamese Foods to Try

Vietnamese Top 100 Foods to Try 1

A month ago, Andrew of Very Good Taste started the Omnivore's Hundred, a high- and low-end list of what he thought every good omnivore should try at least once in their life. Then "100" lists started popping up all over the blogosphere.

Slash Food created 100 Must-Eat American Foods.
Helen of Food Stories joined in with The British One Hundred.
Diana of Appetite for China suggested 100 Chinese Foods Before You Die.
Just Hungry has 100 Japanese Foods to Try.
ZenKimchi chimed in with 100 Korean Foods You Gotta Try.

And if checking off lists is your thing, House of Annie has compiled a Big List of "Things You Must Eat" lists.

So of course, I had to jump in with my own list.



Vietnamese Top 100 Foods to Try 5

These are dishes that I hope represent the diversity of Vietnamese cuisine from Bac (north), Trung (central), and Nam (southern) regions. There's some influence from Chinese cuisine, so I've omitted the overlap in cases where the dish is essentially the same such as rice porridge, mooncakes, and barbecued pork. I did include dishes that may have initially been Chinese but have since veered off in a distinctly unique Vietnamese version. I've included foods such as sauces and herb platters because I think they're essential to Vietnamese cuisine, even if they're not stand-alone dishes. And I'm sure someone will point out something that I've missed. This list isn't intended to be exhaustive. Rather, I want it to serve as a list of Vietnamese food to encourage people to explore the variety and diversity of Vietnamese cuisine.

Since some of these dishes may be new to many of you, the first list includes links from either my blog or others so you can get an idea of what the dish is like. The second list down below is just a plain text list so you can easily cut and paste to play along if you wish.

Much thanks to John of Flagrant Disregard, who created the mosaic program and all the other cool photo toys at Big Huge Labs, so I could add some mosaic photos.

Vietnamese Top 100 Foods to Try 2

1. Banh Bao (Steamed Bun)
2. Banh Beo (Rice Flour Discs with Dried Shrimp)
3. Banh Bot Loc/Banh Quai Vac (Dumplings with Pork and Shrimp or just Shrimp)
4. Banh Canh Cua (Udon-like Noodles with Crab)
5. Banh Chung/Banh Tet (Lunar New Year Sticky Rice Cakes)
6. Banh Cuon (Rice Noodle Rolls)
7. Banh Gio (Steamed Triangular Rice Dumplings)
8. Banh Hoi (Rice Vermicelli Sheets)
9. Banh It La Gai (Nettle Leaf Dumplings)
10. Banh It Tran (Round Rice Dumplings with Pork, Shrimp, and Mung Beans)
11. Banh Khot/Banh Cang (Mini Savory Pancakes)
12. Banh La/Banh Nam (Steamed Flat Rice Dumplings with Pork and Shrimp)
13. Banh Mi Hot Ga Op La (French Bread with Sunnyside-Up Eggs)
14. Banh Mi (Sandwiches)
15. Banh Pa Te So (Pate Chaud)
16. Banh Tieu (Fry Bread)
17. Banh Tom (Shrimp and Yam Fritters)
18. Banh Trang (Rice Paper) Bonus points for eating soaked, no-soak, and toasted varieties.
19. Banh Uot ("Wet" Rice Noodle Sheets)
20. Banh Xeo (Sizzling Crepes) Bonus points if you've eaten both the palm-sized Central-style ones, and the wok-sized Southern-style ones with turmeric and coconut milk.
21. Be Thui (Beef with Roasted Rice Powder and Fermented Bean Curd)
22. Bo Bia (Spring Rolls with Chinese Sausage, Dried Shrimp, and Jicama)
23. Bo Kho (Beef Stew)
24. Bo Luc Lac (Shaking Beef)
25. Bo Ne ("Stand Back" Steak and Eggs)
26. Bo Nhung Dam (Beef Dipped in Vinegar)
27. Bo Nuong La Lot (Grilled Beef with Wild Betel Leaves)
28. Bo Tai Chanh (Beef Carpaccio with Lemon)
29. Bo Xao voi Khoai Tay Chien (Beef Stir-fry with French Fries)
30. Bo Xao Xa (Beef Sauteed with Lemongrass)
31. Bun Bo Hue (Hue-Style Beef Noodle Soup)
32. Bun Cha Hanoi (Hanoi-Style Rice Vermicelli with Grilled Pork Patties)
33. Bun Nuoc Leo Soc Trang (Soc Trang-Style Noodle Soup with Fish, Pork, and Shrimp) Bonus points for its more pungent cousin Bun Mam (Noodle Soup with Fermented Fish Broth)
34. Bun Rieu (Rice Vermicelli Noodle Soup with Crab Paste)
35. Bun Thit Heo Nuong (Rice Vermicelli with Grilled Pork)
36. Ca Bong Lau Nuong voi Mo Hanh (Roasted Catfish with Scallion Oil)
37. Ca Kho To (Braised Catfish in a Claypot)
38. Ca Phe Sua Da Phin (Iced Drip Coffee with Milk)
39. Canh Bi/Bau Nhoi Thit (Pork-Stuffed Winter Melon Soup)
40. Canh Chua Ca (Sour Fish Soup)
41. Ca Ri Ga (Chicken Curry)
42. Cao Lau (Noodle Soup with Pork from Hoi An)
43. Cha Ca Thang Long (Hanoi-Style Fish with Dill and Turmeric)
44. Cha Gio/Nem Ran (Spring/Egg Rolls) You only get points if you've eaten the Vietnamese egg rolls wrapped in rice paper, not the version with Chinese wheat egg roll wrappers. Bonus points if you've also eaten Central-style Cha Ram (Shrimp Egg Rolls) and Cha Gio Bap/Ram Bap (Corn Egg Rolls).
45. Cha Lua (Steamed Pork Loaf)
46. Chanh Muoi (Salty Lemonade)
47. Chao Tom (Grilled Shrimp Paste Wrapped Around Sugarcane)
48. Che Bap (Corn and Tapioca Pudding with Coconut Milk) or any other coconut milk-based che such as Che Chuoi (Banana Tapioca Pudding) and Che Ba Mau (Three Color Pudding).
49. Che Sam Bo Luong (Dessert Soup with Dried Dates, Dried Longans, Lotus Seeds, and Seaweed)
50. Che Troi Nuoc (Dough Balls in Ginger Syrup)
51. Chuoi Chien (Fried Bananas)
52. Chuot Dong (Southern Field Rats)
53. Com Ga Hai Nam (Hainanese Chicken Rice) must be eaten with #82.
54. Com Hen (Clam Rice)
55. Com Lam (Sticky Rice Steamed in Bamboo)
56. Com Tam (Broken Rice)
57. Com Ruou (Fermented Rice Wine)
58. Cua Rang Muoi Tieu (Salt and Pepper Crab)
59. Dau Phong Luoc (Boiled Peanuts)
60. De (Goat)
61. Dia Rau Song (Raw Herb Platter)
62. Do Chua (Pickled Stuff ie. Carrots and Daikon)
63. Ga Nuong Xa (Grilled Chicken with Lemongrass)
64. Gio Thu (Head Cheese with Pig Ears and Tree Ear Fungus)
65. Goi Du Du Kho Bo (Papaya Salad with Beef Jerky)
66. Goi Cuon (Salad/Spring/Summer Rolls)
67. Goi Ga (Chicken Salad)
68. Goi Mit Ngo Sen (Young Jackfruit and Lotus Root Salad)
69. Hot Vit Lon (Fetal Duck Eggs)
70. Hu Tieu (Tapioca Noodles with Pork and Shrimp) Bonus points for both Saigon, with barbecued pork and shrimp, and Nam Vang (Phnom Penh) style with liver and ground pork.
71. Kem Flan
72. Lau (Hot Pot)
73. Mam Nem (Fermented Anchovy Sauce)
74. Mam Ruoc (Fermented Shrimp Paste)
75. Mi Hoanh Thanh (Wonton Noodle Soup)
76. Mi Quang (Turmeric Noodles with Pork and Shrimp)
77. Mi Vit Tiem (Egg Noodles with Duck and Chinese Herbs)
78. Mi Xao Don (Crispy Chow Mein)
79. Muop Tom Xao (Loofah and Shrimp Stir-fry)
80. Nem Chua (Pickled Pork Sausage with Shredded Pork Skin)
81. Nem Nuong (Grilled Pork Patties)
82. Nuoc Mam Gung (Ginger Fish Sauce)
83. Nuoc Mia (Sugarcane Juice)
84. Oc Buou (Apple Snails) or any other sea snails
85. Pho Ap Chao Bo (Pan-Fried Rice Noodles Sauteed with Beef)
86. Pho Bo (Beef Noodle Soup) bonus points if you've eaten filet mignon pho and for Pho Ga (Chicken Noodle Soup)
87. Rau Ma (Pennywort Juice)
88. Rau Muong Xao (Water Spinach Stir-fried)
89. Soda Xi Muoi (Preserved Plum Drink)
90. Sinh To Bo (Avocado Shake)
91. Sinh To Ca Chua (Tomato Shake)
92. Sinh To Nha Dam (Aloe Vera Shake)
93. Sup Mang Tay Cua (Asparagus and Crab Soup)
94. Tiet Canh (Blood Pudding)
95. Thit Heo Kho Voi Trung (Braised Pork with Eggs)
96. Tom Tau Hu Ky (Shrimp Paste Wrapped in Bean Curd Skin)
97. Tra Atiso (Artichoke Tea)
98. Tuong Ot (Chili Sauce) bonus points for Vietnamese American Huy Fong Sriracha Chili Sauce and extra bonus points if you use it to make Sriracha Buffalo Wings
99. Xiu Mai (Meatballs)
100. Xoi (Sticky Rice)

Vietnamese Top 100 Foods to Try 3

Copy and paste this list to your blog.

Bold the foods you've eaten.
Leave alone the foods you haven't eaten.
Strike through the foods you don't ever intend to eat.

Please link back to this post if you play along. And if you don't have a blog, feel free to cut and paste and play along in comments.

Vietnamese 100 Foods to Try

1. Banh Bao (Steamed Bun)
2. Banh Beo (Rice Flour Discs with Dried Shrimp)
3. Banh Bot Loc/Banh Quai Vac (Dumplings with Pork and Shrimp or just Shrimp)
4. Banh Canh Cua (Udon-like Noodles with Crab)
5. Banh Chung/Banh Tet (Lunar New Year Sticky Rice Cakes)
6. Banh Cuon (Rice Noodle Rolls)
7. Banh Gio (Steamed Triangular Rice Dumplings)
8. Banh Hoi (Rice Vermicelli Sheets)
9. Banh It La Gai (Nettle Leaf Dumplings)
10. Banh It Tran (Round Rice Dumplings with Pork, Shrimp, and Mung Beans)
11. Banh Khot/Banh Cang (Mini Savory Pancakes)
12. Banh La/Banh Nam (Steamed Flat Rice Dumplings with Pork and Shrimp)
13. Banh Mi Hot Ga Op La (French Bread with Sunnyside-Up Eggs)
14. Banh Mi (Sandwiches)
15. Banh Pa Te So (Pate Chaud)
16. Banh Tieu (Fry Bread)
17. Banh Tom (Shrimp and Yam Fritters)
18. Banh Trang (Rice Paper) Bonus points for eating soaked, no-soak, and toasted varieties.
19. Banh Uot ("Wet" Rice Noodle Sheets)
20. Banh Xeo (Sizzling Crepes) Bonus points if you've eaten both the palm-sized Central-style ones, and the wok-sized Southern-style ones with turmeric and coconut milk.
21. Be Thui (Beef with Roasted Rice Powder and Fermented Bean Curd)
22. Bo Bia (Spring Rolls with Chinese Sausage, Dried Shrimp, and Jicama)
23. Bo Kho (Beef Stew)
24. Bo Luc Lac (Shaking Beef)
25. Bo Ne ("Stand Back" Steak and Eggs)
26. Bo Nhung Dam (Beef Dipped in Vinegar)
27. Bo Nuong La Lot (Grilled Beef with Wild Betel Leaves)
28. Bo Tai Chanh (Beef Carpaccio with Lemon)
29. Bo Xao voi Khoai Tay Chien (Beef Stir-fry with French Fries)
30. Bo Xao Xa (Beef Sauteed with Lemongrass)
31. Bun Bo Hue (Hue-Style Beef Noodle Soup)
32. Bun Cha Hanoi (Hanoi-Style Rice Vermicelli with Grilled Pork Patties)
33. Bun Nuoc Leo Soc Trang (Soc Trang-Style Noodle Soup with Fish, Pork, and Shrimp) Bonus points for its more pungent cousin Bun Mam (Noodle Soup with Fermented Fish Broth)
34. Bun Rieu (Vermicelli Rice Noodle Soup with Crab Paste)
35. Bun Thit Heo Nuong (Rice Vermicelli with Grilled Pork)
36. Ca Bong Lau Nuong voi Mo Hanh (Roasted Catfish with Scallion Oil)
37. Ca Kho To (Braised Catfish in a Claypot)
38. Ca Phe Sua Da Phin (Iced Drip Coffee with Milk)
39. Canh Bi/Bau Nhoi Thit (Pork-Stuffed Winter Melon Soup)
40. Canh Chua Ca (Sour Fish Soup)
41. Ca Ri Ga (Chicken Curry)
42. Cao Lau (Noodle Soup with Pork from Hoi An)
43. Cha Ca Thang Long (Hanoi-Style Fish with Dill and Turmeric)
44. Cha Gio/Nem Ran (Spring/Egg Rolls) You only get points if you've eaten the Vietnamese egg rolls wrapped in rice paper, not the version with Chinese wheat egg roll wrappers. Bonus points if you've also eaten Central-style Cha Ram (Shrimp Egg Rolls) and Cha Gio Bap/Ram Bap (Corn Egg Rolls).
45. Cha Lua (Steamed Pork Loaf)
46. Chanh Muoi (Salty Lemonade)
47. Chao Tom (Grilled Shrimp Paste Wrapped Around Sugarcane)
48. Che Bap (Corn and Tapioca Pudding with Coconut Milk) or any other coconut milk-based che such as Che Chuoi (Banana Tapioca Pudding) and Che Ba Mau (Three Color Pudding).
49. Che Sam Bo Luong (Dessert Soup with Dried Dates, Dried Longans, Lotus Seeds, and Seaweed)
50. Che Troi Nuoc (Dough Balls in Ginger Syrup)
51. Chuoi Chien (Fried Bananas)
52. Chuot Dong (Southern Field Rats)
53. Com Ga Hai Nam (Hainanese Chicken Rice) must be eaten with #82.
54. Com Hen (Clam Rice)
55. Com Lam (Sticky Rice Steamed in Bamboo)
56. Com Tam (Broken Rice)
57. Com Ruou (Fermented Rice Wine)
58. Cua Rang Muoi Tieu (Salt and Pepper Crab)
59. Dau Phong Luoc (Boiled Peanuts)
60. De (Goat)
61. Dia Rau Song (Raw Herb Platter)
62. Do Chua (Pickled Stuff ie. Carrots and Daikon)
63. Ga Nuong Xa (Grilled Chicken with Lemongrass)
64. Gio Thu (Head Cheese with Pig Ears and Tree Ear Fungus)
65. Goi Du Du Kho Bo (Papaya Salad with Beef Jerky)
66. Goi Cuon (Salad/Spring/Summer Rolls)
67. Goi Ga (Chicken Salad)
68. Goi Mit Ngo Sen (Young Jackfruit and Lotus Root Salad)
69. Hot Vit Lon (Fetal Duck Eggs)
70. Hu Tieu (Tapioca Noodles with Pork and Shrimp) Bonus points for both Saigon, with barbecued pork and shrimp, and Nam Vang (Phnom Penh) style with liver and ground pork.
71. Kem Flan
72. Lau (Hot Pot)
73. Mam Nem (Fermented Anchovy Sauce)
74. Mam Ruoc (Fermented Shrimp Paste)
75. Mi Hoanh Thanh (Wonton Noodle Soup)
76. Mi Quang (Turmeric Noodles with Pork and Shrimp)
77. Mi Vit Tiem (Egg Noodles with Duck and Chinese Herbs)
78. Mi Xao Don (Crispy Chow Mein)
79. Muop Tom Xao (Loofah and Shrimp Stir-fry)
80. Nem Chua (Pickled Pork Sausage with Shredded Pork Skin)
81. Nem Nuong (Grilled Pork Patties)
82. Nuoc Mam Gung (Ginger Fish Sauce)
83. Nuoc Mia (Sugarcane Juice)
84. Oc Buou (Apple Snails) or any other sea snails
85. Pho Ap Chao Bo (Pan-Fried Rice Noodles Sauteed with Beef)
86. Pho Bo (Beef Noodle Soup) bonus points if you've eaten filet mignon pho and for Pho Ga (Chicken Noodle Soup)
87. Rau Ma (Pennywort Juice)
88. Rau Muong Xao (Water Spinach Stir-fried)
89. Soda Xi Muoi (Salty Preserved Plum Drink)
90. Sinh To Bo (Avocado Shake)
91. Sinh To Ca Chua (Tomato Shake)
92. Sinh To Nha Dam (Aloe Vera Shake)
93. Sup Mang Tay Cua (Asparagus and Crab Soup)
94. Tiet Canh (Blood Pudding)
95. Thit Heo Kho Voi Trung (Braised Pork with Eggs)
96. Tom Tau Hu Ky (Shrimp Paste Wrapped in Bean Curd Skin)
97. Tra Atiso (Artichoke Tea)
98. Tuong Ot (Chili Sauce) bonus points for Vietnamese American Huy Fong Sriracha Chili Sauce and extra bonus points if you use it to make Sriracha Buffalo Wings
99. Xiu Mai (Meatballs)
100. Xoi (Sticky Rice)

Vietnamese Top 100 Foods to Try 4

How'd you score?

I've eaten everything on this list, including the bonus dishes, except #52. Chuot Dong (Southern Field Rats) and #42. Cao Lau (Noodle Soup with Pork from Hoi An). I'll have to go back to Vietnam to be able to cross those off my list.

And I don't think I'll ever try #94 Tiet Canh (Blood Pudding). I stand corrected. On April 25, 2009, I tried tiet canh de (goat blood pudding).

*****
1 year ago today, 3 of 7 random things about me meme: I make my own Homemade Body Scrub.

74 comments:

  1. Oh wow! I am impressed. I think this is one list that I want to try to finish! Gonna print it out and take it with me everytime we go out for Vietnamese.

    Thanks for the link love. I will add your list to our Big List!

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a great idea! I'm relatively new to Vietnamese food, but I've loved everything I've tried so far. We have one Vietnamese restaurant in town, so I'll have to take your list with me when I go. I also just bought "Into the Vietnamese Kitchen", so your list can be my guide.

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  3. why wouldn't you eat tiet canh?You have to try it, it's good!

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    Replies
    1. I made a face when i read your tiet canh comment. Though my family is a huge fan.

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    2. yes, you should try ! but you carefull H5N1

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  4. You know, what I find particularly cool is that most of these links are to your own posts!

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  5. Now that I've gone through these, I count 73 that I've eaten at one time or another - not that I liked all of them, but at least once. Fun list :-)

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  6. Sheesh that's some list.....so many lists...so much food...so little time...and only one stomach. Life is not always fair!

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  7. Wow, I appreciate the effort it must've taken you to compile that list! And everything is linked! And like nikkipolani said, many of those links are to things you've already written about! You're a human encyclopedia of Vietnamese Food.

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  8. This is a fantastic list. Unfortunately I haven't tried a lot of them (there are not many Vietnamese restaurants around here). But I plan on trying several of them.

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  9. pure awesomeness. i was just thinking that someone ought to compile the viet 100. i'm glad you did!!

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  10. I guess I gotta find those field rats if I wanna finish the 15 foods I haven't tried yet.... eep!

    I used to think that un-soaked banh trang was so good. Now it just tastes stale to me, haha. Sometimes I see little kids munching on them so maybe it's a kid thing?

    Great list!

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  11. How fun! I love Vietnamese food but I tend to stick to my ten favorites. I'll definitely have to read through your list and see what I've eaten. Might have call my mom and talk to her about it. She'll love it! Thanks for the list!
    /Clara

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  12. Good effort in coming out with this post! I don't think i dare to try duck blood pudding either.

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  13. Between this list and your recipes, I might be able to add to my list.
    When I was a kid, I used to eat Czarnina--Polish Duck Blood Soup. I didn't know what it was, I just liked it because it had raisins and prunes in it. I wouldn't eat it today though.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I live for lists!

    When I first started seeing the 100 foods trend, my first thought was "Wandering Chopsticks should do one for Vietnamese food." And now you have.

    You're SO on top of things!

    I can't wait to start working my way through the list.

    ReplyDelete
  15. wandering chopsticks, this post must have taken you hours to do! amazing.

    I think i need to eat more of those-I can only spot less than 10 that I have tried!! Speaking of which, I had viet coffee the other day and it was superb! I had to get the lady boss to teach me though. a tad red faced but it doesnt matter when I was able to sip a strong fragrant cup of coffee like this!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Nate and Annie,
    I can't believe you found so many lists! Or that there's two vegetarian and a vegan list.

    Susan,
    I hope this encourages you to explore Vietnamese cuisine. That's the whole point of why I created the list. :)

    Lauraxplora,
    Tiet canh has always freaked me out. It's so red!

    Nikki,
    I'm glad you're impressed. I wondered if people would think I'm shamelessly self-promoting. I actually could fill up even more of the list, I just haven't posted about some of those dishes yet.

    Kirk,
    I think you've eaten most of this list too!

    Marvin,
    I felt the links were necessary because most non-Vietnamese people probably wouldn't know what I'm talking about, even with minimal descriptions. Haha! I'm glad you and Nikki are impressed instead of thinking I'm tooting my own horn! ;)

    Pam,
    I think you should start with my Vietnamese sandwich recipe you were eyeing a while back! :)

    Cathy,
    Someone had to do it. Well, not "had" to, but I'd been mulling over it for a while.

    Christine D.,
    Ack! Thanks for the reminder. I haven't eaten field rats either. Must correct that. No-soak rice paper is actually a thinner version. Click on the link. It's not just eating rice paper without water. :P

    Clara,
    I tend to eat only my favorites as well. Don't we all? I wonder if your mom has different ideas of what are must-haves for Vietnamese cuisine?

    PP,
    It's the thought and appearance of congealed duck blood that just icks me out!

    MaryRuth,
    Oh that's fascinating. I knew about blood sausage but didn't know there was a soup. Although a soup with raisins and prunes doesn't sound very appealing to me.

    Susan C.,
    Well, not that quick. The trend started a month ago! ;) It's nice to know you were thinking of me.

    Daphne,
    Try days! I'd been thinking of what to include for a while, but yeah, it did take me hours and hours to work on the post. Can't go wrong with Vietnamese coffee.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wow, just under 30 I haven't eaten - being a rather fussy eater, I'm somewhat proud of myself...granted, this one was the only big list I think I could have done this well in =)

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  18. LOL!! Oh, now I see. That's the first time I've heard of no-soak banh trang. Sounds much more palatable than un-soaked-but-needs-to-be-soaked banh trang.

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  19. Awesome list, but I'll need to get cracking if I want to eat through this list before I die! Sadly, I can probably count the number of dishes I've tried on both hands ;-(.

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  20. Being Vietnamese, I am proud to say that I have eaten about 87% of everything you have listed. Now to get my hands on the rest. HMMMM!

    Thanks for posting up such an awesome list!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Chris,
    That's a pretty good score then if you're really that fussy. :)

    Christine D.,
    Haha! Yeah, I don't think I've ever tried eating regular banh trang without soaking it. And how come you haven't eaten toasted banh trang?

    Darlene,
    You can check off at least five items on that list after our lunch and my mom's banh xeo. :)

    An6uhuh,
    87% I think that's the highest score yet. Well, after mine of course. :P

    ReplyDelete
  22. Oh my gosh I miss those dishes! I'm a Vietnamese who grew up in North America but had the chance to come back to Vietnam during the holidays and learn the genuine taste of Vietnamese food. I've been addicted to Banh U, Banh Bot Loc and Banh It La Gai, that are unfortunately very hard to find here.

    Say, do you have any idea where to buy some Gai leaves? I'd like to try a Banh It La Gai recipe but the plant seems to be unknown to Americans.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Simple Smile,
    I thought about adding banh u, but it's really Chinese so I didn't. :P

    I have no idea if you can find la gai in stores. My family grows it so I've never looked.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I'm really impressed... I'll print out your list if I go to Vietnam for a holiday hehe

    ReplyDelete
  25. Wiffy,
    You should go! I'm telling you to. :)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Wow, my favorite food blogger actually visited my humble page :D *happy*

    Your list is great! And I just realized that I missed the "American 100" (but in my opinion they are very similar to the Omnivore's 100") and the "British 100". I was so absorbed by your fantastic recipe list :D

    Yes, I probably score as badly as you in the opposite direction, but this is of course for different reasons I suppose... Greek food is available in most biggest countries of the world, but when your own cooking is already so stellar you seldom reach out for other cuisines I would say (in your case). In my case, to the fact that Greek food is my favorite and so I do not search a lot for new experiences, comes the sad fact that Vietnamese restaurants are of course scarce here, and good homestyle Vietnamese cooking can be learned only from a real home cook. Thank goodness there is Wandering Chopsticks!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Haha! I'm touched. I don't think anyone's ever been that excited to see me comment. :P

    Oh no, my whole philosophy about food is to specifically try every other cuisine.

    It's not that I don't seek out Greek cuisine, but that it's probably limited to the well-known ones. Let's see: spanakopita, baklava, moussaka, Greek salad, stuffed bell peppers, ouzo, gyros, dolmades. I was in Greece 4 years ago, ate a lot including various lamb and chicken dishes, but I couldn't name the dishes beyond the well-known ones. So checking off the list would be a little harder because of that.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Oh my !
    Your list is amazing ! Thank you for sharing it, i'm gonna copy it to my blog too.
    This list helps me to remember some dishes that I haven't eaten for a while, I won't forget to cook them now !
    Thank you so much!

    http://t3peacefr.canalblog.com

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thao,
    I was really surprised at some of the dishes you haven't tried. I hope you do eventually check off more from the list.

    ReplyDelete
  30. yep..
    There are probably some that I did have eaten, but don't know the name, and it's difficult to refer to a picture ;-)
    I'll ask my mother next time.. I'm sure she would check off the whole list ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  31. Fantastic list! I got 75/100. FYI, I commented on your comment, it's in my queue, should show up next week!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Thao,
    Haha! I don't know if my parents have eaten field rats to check off the whole list. :P

    Jeannie,
    I expected you to have scored higher! Get eating lady!

    ReplyDelete
  33. This is such a great list, and I'm bummed that I didn't have it with me during my last trip to Vietnam...which ended two days ago!

    Have you ever tried banh can? When I was wandering around Phan Thiet, which is apparently known for this particular dish, I found a wonderful little sidewalk banh can spot that's only open in the late afternoon and evening. It was my single greatest food discovery on my trip. (http://theworldtastesgood.com/?page_id=1499 -- if you're interested, it's at the very bottom of the page)

    ReplyDelete
  34. David,
    Banh cang is also called banh khot. It's #11 on the list. Looks like your version didn't have the shrimp, but it's still the same dish. Some versions use rice flour, some add a bit of turmeric.

    I've never seen canh chua with green mango before though, although I don't see why not? I must try that some day.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Thank you for posting the Pho recipe. I really like your narrative style instructions. Am better with that than reading lists, dot points.

    I cooked it yesterday and it was a success! I'd like to cook the Viet spring rolls next - What are they called?

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  36. Strong Coffee,
    Thanks for trying out my recipe. I'm more of a visual learner myself. The fried Viet spring rolls are called cha gio.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Nice list. I'm only missing 3, and the field rat is one of them. I don't think i will try that. ever.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Annieebananniee,
    I just ate com hen so I can cross that off. Down to only 3 now too.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I see that you listed "Pho" as #86 - why?!

    Just not sure if you have listed these as your preferences or are they in no particular order/ preferences?!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Zeitgeist,
    I thought it was fairly obvious that the list is in alphabetical order.

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  41. Great list and blog :)
    I really hope you would try Tiet Canh one day though it's really not as bad as it looks. That's the one dish I wanted to eat in VN but I didn't have enough time to travel to the place that specializes in it.

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  42. Thuy,
    My dad used to make tiet canh at home. It's such a bloody red that I've always been too scared to try! Maybe I'll conquer my fear some day.

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  43. extra points for Huy Fong Sriracha??? Heck I put that on breakfast Taquitos and just about anything if it's handy.

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  44. Cringe Schrapnel,
    Huy Fong sriracha goes with everything! :P

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  45. This is a great list. I've had everything except for the tomato shake, aloe vera shake (I've only had Sinh To in Vietnam and stuck with the fruit-based ones), artichoke tea (I'm intrigued with this) and um, field rat. I will probably link this to my site as call it "Food I Will Learn to Make!"

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  46. Looks like a fun list! Thanks for working to compile it. I'm looking forward to trying out some recipes when I get back to a kitchen.

    Note: I clicked on #100 "Sticky Rice" and it took me to a WC page on shallots.

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  47. I've had the cao lau! (Verdict: YUM.) But oh my, I will print out the list and work on it while I am next in Westminster...Great idea, WC!

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  48. Amazing list! I am Vietnamese and even I haven't tried them all! Love it!

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  49. Dear WC,
    I just wanted to let you know that I refer to your list of 100 Vietnamese foods to try all the time. The photos are evocative and luminous and the piece has a great spirit of adventure. You say it's not exhaustive, but your site to me is like an unabridged encyclopedia of Vietnamese foods and culture. I am in awe. Thanks! Kelly von Hemert

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  50. Girl Feeds Boy,
    Funny! Except for the field rats, the drinks are relatively normal. You could easily knock those off at any Vietnamese restaurant.

    EJL,
    The links aren't all to recipes. I said they were to where you could see what the food looks like. If you looked on the fried shallots post, you'd see that they're atop sticky rice.

    Tammy,
    I'm so jealous! I want to visit Hoi An some day just to explore and to eat cao lau.

    Handinhvu,
    Neither have I! But I'm working on it.

    Galley Girl,
    That's great! That's exactly the attitude I was hoping to generate with this list. I want people to explore and try more dishes beyond pho. I like pho as much as the next girl, but Vietnamese food is so much more than that!

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  51. I can say I am fortunate to have eaten everything on that list =). However I would substitute some of the Sinh To fillers for things like bun oc, canh ca bung, bun thang.

    Overall an incredible list. One that I could only add too and never have the patience to create myself.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Johann,
    Subjective list. What I deemed important. :) I can't believe you've eaten field rats!

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  53. When in Ro...Vietnam. =) I bet you can convince more people to eat field rats than Durian.

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  54. Besides tiet canh and chuot dong, what is the last item on your list that you have yet to try? (If you already mentioned it I apologize for the oversight)

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  55. Johann,
    Haha. If the field rats were spatchcocked and grilled, I bet they'd probably look like rabbit. I'd eat it then.

    Vinh,
    I have eaten tiet canh. Last year. See my link at the end of the post. It wasn't half bad. I think it was just always visually scary for me. So just chuot dong and cao lau are left. How many have you crossed off my list?

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  56. 99/100 and I don't think I will be able to get a perfect score anytime soon as I can't seem to find a place that serves field mice around here, heh

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  57. Vinh,
    I could have made it easier but I threw in cao lau and chuot dong because you have to specifically be in Vietnam to eat those dishes. :P

    I asked my mom once why we didn't visit Hoi An when my family went to Hue in '94. She said it wasn't as touristy as it is now so there wasn't much for us to stop off and see. Actually, Hue in '94 was still a little hard for tourists. We had a hard time exchanging American money even.

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  58. pulled a 97 or so. Can't remember ;). There's a bunch out there. How about luon xao xuc banh da, banh trang phoi suong (trang bang), vit quay lang son, heo gia cay & rang muc (phan thiet)? Yeah, def. so much more than Phở. Viva Vietnam!

    ReplyDelete
  59. hi! i came across your blog when i searched for the meaning of muop gai. any idea what kind of vegetable that is? My late uncle left me some seeds and I have a whole packet of black seeds that I would to try but need to know how to grow it. The package has no other writing on it but "muop gai" I would appreciate any help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I googled its scientific name: Lasia Spinosa Thwaiters

      Delete
  60. A. Rizzi,
    That's pretty good! Oooh, all those dishes sound awesome!

    Romi,
    Muop is loofah. Gai, I think is thorny, but I've never heard of thorny loofah. I think this might be the ridged loofah since the ridges could be interpreted as thorny, for the namesake. Just plant it along a fence or trellis since loofahs are a vine and need to hang.

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  61. Thank you! I will plant it and will let you know how it turns out! :)

    ReplyDelete
  62. Romi,
    Please do! I wonder if it's the angled loofah or something else I've never heard of.

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  63. Oh my, I am so glad I found this! Thank you dear Wandering Chopsticks for fueling my Vietnamese food obsession. I worked in Chicago on Argyle St in the 80's and ate at the many lovely Viet places on the block. Then moved out and poof, no more Goi Cuon - for years. Recently I've begun to search out recipes and then found some restaurants close to me (finally!). Out of your list, only 14 that I can remember, but tonight I will make Thit Heo Kho Trung from your recipe and that will bring me to 15. Cheers!

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  64. All of your recipes look amazing and oh so delicious. I made a long list for Vietnamese grocery store so I can attempt to make them. Thank you so much for sharing your recipes. I've been looking for authentic Vietnamese recipes but didnt have much luck until now. Thank you again for sharing!

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  65. Carmie,
    Ah, I miss Argyle. That's where I got my Vietnamese food fix while in college.

    Vietpride,
    You're welcome. Let me know how it goes!

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  66. Awesome list! I've had everything on the list except chuột đồng.
    Too bad the list is not longer cuz gỏi bắp chuối is tasty and uniquely Vietnamese, I think. And bún ốc, and cháo lòng, and bánh cam, and soda sữa hột gà. I realize the 100 things are not meant to be exhaustive, but damn, I love Vietnamese food!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Vu,
    I added the chuot dong to make it a little challenging. Goi bap chuoi would have been nice to add too. I didn't add chao long or banh cam because those are also Chinese. No list could please everyone. This wasn't meant to be exhaustive, but rather to introduce people to Vietnamese cuisine.

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  68. This list is absolutely amazing, and also made me incredibly homesick for the food of Little Saigon! Attending Berkeley in the Bay Area without access to a car (and therefore the San Jose-area restaurants) is depriving me of quality Vietnamese food.

    I've had 95/100 of these items! Pretty good for a 21 year old, yes? :)

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  69. Julie,
    Good job! Not a bad total at all.

    Take the BART into SF and hit up the Tenderloin or Clement St. It's not quite the same, but when you've really got a craving. Or heck, just go into Oakland. Plenty of choices there.

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  70. Hà Tiên đáp ứng mọi yêu cầu của quý khách như tư vấn thiết kế bếp công nghiệp cho nhà hàng về kỹ thuật đạt được qui trình bếp một chiều giúp giảm được chi phí khi vận hành thực tế. Dựa vào thực đơn của nhà hàng, Công ty Hà Tiên tư vấn loại thiết bị bếp chọn lựa thích hợp, giúp nhà đầu tư có được thiết bị đúng mục đích sử dụng và có giá thành đầu tư tổng thể cho khu bếp là tốt nhất.

    ReplyDelete
  71. Tên gọi dimsum là gì tên gọi chung của một dòng món ăn đặc trưng của người Trung Hoa. Dimsum có các món ăn hấp, chiên, nướng, nhưng riêng đối với người Quảng Đông thì các món hấp được ưa chuộng hơn và chọn làm bữa sáng. Sự tinh tế của hương vị và sự cầu kì trong cách làm khiến cho DimSum hà nội là một trong những món rất được mọi người ưa thích.

    ReplyDelete

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