Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado

13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 1


After a lunch of bison sausage and Navajo fry bread tacos at Spruce Tree Terrace Cafe, we made our way over to the Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum to learn a little more about the history of the Anasazi. The museum is located in the same parking area as the restaurant and the Spruce Tree House cliff dwelling so it's an easy and quick stop since we were already there.

And it's free!

Dioramas depicting the history of early man in the Four Corners area. They were hunters and gatherers here 10,000 to 15,000 years ago.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 2


Early Basketmaker II Era, about 1200 B.C. to 50 A.D. The people lived in caves and wove baskets, hence the name. They had not invented pottery yet.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 3


Late Basketmaker II Era, 50 A.D. to 500 A.D., the people began building shallow pithouses.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 4


The pithouses got deeper and then eventually became above-ground pueblos.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 5


Pueblo Era, 750 A.D. to 1300 A.D. These are the cliff dwellings for which Mesa Verde is mostly known.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 6



13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 7


The hole in the ground is a kiva, used for ceremonial purposes. The round pits that you saw in Balcony House and Cliff Palace were kivas.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 8


Some of the artifacts that were found included deer hoof rattles.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 9


A cutting board.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 10


A thousand years ago and crutches are still basically the same.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 11


A bag obviously made from an animal's skin.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 12


Sandals.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 13


Around 750 to 900 A.D., in what is considered the Pueblo I era, the Anasazi invented pottery.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 14


Some more decorative pottery.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 15


Crude spoons.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 16


Much more elaborate ladles.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 17


Pithouses were initially constructed because they were cooler during the dry, hot summers.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 18


The interior of a pithouse.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 19



13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 20


The round underground chamber was a kiva.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 21


The hole in the center is for fire and the smaller hole represents the entrance into the underworld.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 22


Logs would build up the roof until it was almost completely covered, with just a hole through the center for entrance.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 23


Eventually, the pithouses became above-ground adobe houses.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 24



13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 25



13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 26


The stone adobe houses comprise the majority of the cliff dwellings.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 27


Which are still used in southwest architecture today.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 28


Remember this corner of the museum. I'll be using it as a reference point later during our hike.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 29


Onward to Spruce Tree House.


13 Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado 30


Posts in this series:
Sadie's of New Mexico - Albuquerque - New Mexico
Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum - Albuquerque - New Mexico
Shiprock - New Mexico
Ted's Taco - Mancos - Colorado
Balcony House - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
House of Many Windows - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Hemenway House - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Cliff Palace - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Spruce Tree Terrace Cafe - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Spruce Tree House - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Petroglyph Point Trail - Mesa Verde National Park - Colorado
Cortez Cultural Center - Cortez - Colorado
Main Street Brewery & Restaurant - Cortez - Colorado
Absolute Bakery & Cafe - Mancos - Colorado
Four Corners Monument - Shiprock - New Mexico
Pine Country Restaurant - Williams - Arizona
Grand Canyon National Park (South Rim) - Arizona

Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum
Mesa Verde National Park
P.O. Box 8
Mesa Verde, Colorado 81330
970-529-4465
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

7-day vehicle fee $10, $15 from Memorial Day to Labor Day
$3 tickets are required to take ranger-guided tours of Cliff Palace, Balcony House, and Long House. Tickets may be purchased from inside the park at Far View Visitor Center and must be purchased in person.

*****
1 year ago today, Banana and Coconut Frozen Yogurt Popsicles.
2 years ago today, no-soak rice paper.

2 comments:

Thank you for stopping by. I try to respond in a timely manner, but am not always able to do so. If you're awaiting a response, check the post in which the comment is made or click the "Notify me" option.

If you're not a blogger and you'd like to leave a comment, you can do so using your Google/Gmail account.

I welcome questions, discussions, and feedback, but please be mindful that this is my home online. I reserve the right to delete any comment that is anonymous or unknown, rude, promotional, or has a link.

Thank you for reading!